Ctesifonte was one of the largest commercial cities in

Ctesifonte was one of the largest commercial cities in

3/10/2021, 2:18:47 AM
Ctesifonte was one of the largest commercial cities in Mesopotamia for almost 800 years. Established on the east bank of the Tigris River, it was founded by Mitrídates I around 120 BC as an important political center. For centuries it was the scene of great battles with the Romans, being totally destroyed in the 3rd century but rebuilt by the Sassanid Persian king Artaxes I, who made it the capital of the Empire. The structure of the photo is the arch of Ctesifonte, built in the 6th century to house the governors of the region, being the only remaining remains of the entire city. In the 7th century, it had 500,000 inhabitants, located today in southern Baghdad, Iraq. The Persian Sassanid Empire was one of the main powers in Western Asia until the first centuries of the Middle Ages. Its domains ranged from present-day Iran to Turkey, becoming one of the most powerful of the time along with the Roman and Byzantine Empire. Caravans that came from China, on the Silk Road, stopped and sold various products in Ctesifonte, making it rich culturally. In this way, many scientific studies made by the Chinese influenced the Persians, later incorporated by the Arabs. With the expansion of the Moors to the Iberian Peninsula in the 8th century, the Arab scientific legacy was brought to present day Spain and Portugal. With the defeat of the Persian Sassanid Empire by the Arabs in the 7th century, Ctesifonte was later incorporated by the Ottoman Empire in the 13th to the 20th century. The Sassanid legacy would influence what would become Persia and later Iran, a topic that we covered in our 19th podcast: (link in the bio) During the First World War, Ctesifonte was the target of a battle in 1915 between the Ottomans and the English, which contributed to its degradation. The monument underwent reconstruction by Saddam Hussein in 1980, who restored the north wing. With the fall of Saddam in 2003, the Iraqi government is now working with the University of Chicago to restore the site. If you like our content, we appreciate those who contribute to our campaign on Picpay, the link highlighted in our profile with the name "contribute!" Posted by @geopizz

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