The Kingdom of Zimbabwe was one of the largest in southern

The Kingdom of Zimbabwe was one of the largest in southern

8/3/2021, 7:16:20 PM
The Kingdom of Zimbabwe was one of the largest in southern Africa, from 1100 to 1450. The stone structure is the Grande Recinto, built as a royal and military residence. The Kingdom of Zimbabwe emerged thanks to mining and trade with other African, Arab and Asian kingdoms. Ivory was often traded for luxury goods such as Chinese Ming or Persian porcelain. Zimbabwe had more than 150 tributary states, controlling access to gold, copper and iron mines. The society was usually run by men, representatives of royal families. Each man's status was measured by how many cattle and women he owned. While hunting, ranching and weaving were male activities, women worked in agriculture, cooking and transport. The population around the Great Enclosure numbered nearly 20,000 people, more than half living outside its walls. At 5.5 meters high, the structure had circular canals and a tower at its center, probably serving for religious purposes. Residences were usually made of mud with thatched roofs, their diameter increasing according to social status. Although informal trade existed, much of it was taxed by the rulers. The capital of the kingdom was called Lusvingo, mostly inhabited by the Xona peoples, from the Bantu linguistic trunk. It was later renamed Zimbabwe, meaning "house of stones" influenced by the nomenclature of the future country. Around 1450, another kingdom in the region, Monomotapa, grew through the salt trade overshadowing Zimbabwe's importance. Added to soil erosion due to livestock, the Grande Enclosure was gradually abandoned. With the colonization of Africa in the 19th century, many of the relics from the African and Asian times were stolen by other Europeans, not found until today. Selected by @geopizza

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